1970s


Sir David Wallace »   Michael Wise »   David Broadhurst »   Peter Jenkins »   Bruno Weymuller »   Sir Graeme Catto »   Professor Aldwyn Cooper »   Dr Edwina Moreton »   James Bathurst »   Paul Calthrop »   Cataldo Louis Cammarata »   Koen Lenaerts »   Anthony Long »   Sara Nathan »   David Soskin »   David Walker »   Tom Hayhoe »  

 

Sir David Wallace (HF 1970-72) CBE FRS FREng FRSE Following undergraduate and postgraduate study at the University of Edinburgh, David continued his research in theoretical physics at Princeton University. In 1972 he was appointed lecturer in the Physics Department at the University of Southampton. In 1979 he returned to the University of Edinburgh as Tait Professor of Mathematical Physics, and Director of Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre. He was Vice-Chancellor at Loughborough University for 12 years, from 1994, and moved to Cambridge in 2006, as NM Rothschild & Sons Professor of Mathematical Sciences & Director of the Isaac Newton Institute to 2011, and as Master of Churchill College to 2014, retiring then to Scotland. He has held many honorary positions in Academies and Learned Societies, and on Trusts and Foundations, and served as a non-executive director in a number of companies. He is currently a member of Court (the Governing Body) of the University of St Andrews, a trustee of the Bill McLaren Foundation and chairs the Board of the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences. He was awarded a CBE for services to parallel computing in 1996, and knighted in 2004 for services to UK science, technology and engineering. In 1995 he ran the London Marathon, raising £8000 for Sports Aid Foundation and Loughborough Sports Scholarships. His time of just under four hours is surely the slowest ​ever in a Loughborough vest. He retired to Scotland in 2014 with his wife Elizabeth. They have one daughter, Sara. https://www.chu.cam.ac.uk/people/view/david-wallace/
Last updated: 25th May 2018

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Michael Wise (HF 1970 - 72) , first dentist to be awarded the Fellowship, obtained an M.Sc.D. in Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics at Indiana University. After a period in academia, he developed his own team in private practice to assess and measure the outcomes of an integrated approach to complex dental restorative treatment.  Michael was a Visiting Professor at The Eastman Dental Institute, UCL, GDC recognised as a Specialist in Restorative Dentistry and in Oral Surgery, a Fellow of The Royal College of Surgeons, an invited member of The American Academy of Restorative Dentistry and The American College of Dentists, and a past President of The American Dental Society of Europe. In 1977 he started the first one day a month literature based courses, in his practice for up to 20 dentists, a model now standard in dentistry. At retirement he was leading five groups, two had been with him for over 30 years. Lecturing nationally and internationally, Michael  is the author of many publications including a textbook in 1995  “Failure in the Restored Dentition : Management and Treatment”; recognized by the BDA library in its 100th year as one of the most influential books in dentistry. As a recipient of a kidney transplant in 2010 (after sepsis) he became active in projects to improve the treatment of patients with acute kidney injury. In 2017 he published “On The Toss of a Coin“ about his experiences of critical illness.  Married to Priscilla, a psychotherapist, for 52 years, they have three sons and five grandchildren.
Last updated: 14th March 2021

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David Broadhurst (HF 1971-73) had the great fortune to be a Harkness fellow at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center when physicists were discovering the fundamental theories of the strong and weak interactions of quarks and leptons. This was followed by a Royal Society fellowship at CERN in Geneva and a fellowship at Balliol College, Oxford. David’s Harkness fellowship provided the opportunity to visit more than 40 of the United States and three quarters of its national parks. He met Margaret in Fern Canyon, Humboldt County, California and they wed in Coventry in 1975, by which time David was intensively engaged in teaching physics and mathematics to students of the Open University. He continued to combine research and teaching until his retirement from a readership in 2013, since when he has enjoyed frequent invitations to conferences and workshops on quantum field theory and the exquisite mathematics that it entails. He continues to be amazed by “the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences” and lives in hope of seeing an eventual proof of the Broadhurst-Kreimer conjecture on multiple zeta values. A formula discovered by David was inscribed on the bronze statue awarded to Andrew Wiles by the Clay Mathematical Institute to celebrate the proof of Fermat’s last theorem. David served for more than 30 years as a governor of a primary school that seeks to combine sound education with human values. When in need of solace he turns to Bach and to his grandchildren.
Last updated: 25th October 2018

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Peter Jenkins (HF 1971-73) CMG studied Classics at Cambridge. He was offered a place in the Diplomatic Service in 1971 but obtained a two-year deferral to be able to enrol at Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Science on a Harkness Fellowship. Those two years at Harvard, where he acted in Classical Greek plays at the Loeb Theatre, and a summer spent on a 14,000-mile tour of the United States, in the company of two other Fellows, Bruno Weymuller and John Halliday, led indirectly to Sir Nicholas Henderson choosing him to be his Private Secretary during the closing stages of his term as UK Ambassador to the United States, which coincided with the 1982 Falklands War. They also equipped him to take a dispassionate view of US policies and practices in the governing bodies of the World Trade Organisation and International Atomic Energy Agency, where Peter represented the UK. And his study of Persian while at Harvard came in useful during the last years of his 33-year diplomatic career, since he found himself having to deal with some of the consequences of international concern over Iran’s nuclear programme. In retirement Peter has retained an interest in that issue, and more generally in international nuclear problems; and, as an advocate of diplomacy, has written on these subjects for US blog-sites and newspapers.
Last updated: 25th May 2018

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Bruno Weymuller (HF 1971-72) was a graduate of the Ecole Polytechnique and the Ecole des Mines de Paris when he awarded a French Harkness Fellowship. It took him to the Massachussetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he obtained a Master of Science. Robert Solow supervised his thesis, on “Control theory and macroeconomic consequences”. Back in France he joined in the civil service. In 1978 he was appointed to the Cabinet of the Prime Minister, Raymond Barre, as counselor for Industry and Scientific Research. In 1981, he moved to the international oil major Elf Aquitaine (now Total). There he occupied different management positions in the Upstream and Finance Divisions, ending as executive vice-president for strategy and risk assessment, and a member of the Group Executive Committee. For his various contacts in industrial and financial circles in the United States, over many years, he benefited greatly from the experience he had acquired as a student at MIT and travelling from coast to coast during the summer of 1972, with two English Fellows, both still very good friends. He remains deeply grateful to the Foundation for this exceptional transatlantic opportunity. Now retired, he is, inter alia, member of the bureau of the association “Amis du musée franco-américain de Blérancourt”. This museum, located in the former property of Anne Morgan, daughter of J.P. Morgan, pays tribute to her support for France during the First World War in the form of a medical infrastructure to help the injured, and after 1918 in the form of a decisive contribution to the reconstruction of villages neighbouring Blérancourt. Bruno’s Fellowship experience encouraged his elder son, Charles Henri, to study for a PhD in economics at Harvard, partly thanks to which he now works as an adviser to the President of the French Republic, Emmanuel Macron.
Last updated: 25th May 2018

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Sir Graeme Catto (HF 1975-77) was a lecturer in medicine at the University of Aberdeen, had acquired membership of the Royal Colleges of Physicians (UK) and was completing an MD thesis when he was awarded the fellowship to study medicine and transplant immunology in Boston, Massachusetts, based at Harvard University and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. After two years, Graeme, his wife and two young children, returned to Aberdeen where he was promoted to Senior Lecturer and appointed honorary consultant physician/ nephrologist to the local health board. His clinical and research work went well and promotion to reader, professor, dean and vice-principal ensued. He became medical director of the teaching hospital, a member of an MRC grants committee and chairman of a large independent school. As a member of the General Medical Council, he chaired the Education Committee before becoming President at a time of some turbulence for the organisation and the medical profession. At the turn of the millennium, Graeme Catto was appointed Vice-Principal at King’s College London, Dean of the Guy’s, King’s College and St Thomas’ Hospitals Medical and Dental Schools and Pro Vice-Chancellor, University of London. He was a founder member and Treasurer of the Academy of Medical Sciences, a member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Qatar Science & Technology Park, Caribbean Accreditation Authority and Qatar Council for Healthcare Professionals. Knighted in 2002 for services to medicine and medical education, Graeme Catto has been awarded a number of honorary degrees and fellowships. Retired from practice, he continues to support medical education initiatives in the UK and abroad.
Last updated: 25th May 2018

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Professor Aldwyn Cooper (HF 1975-76) was the demonstrator in experimental Psychology at Bristol University completing his PhD in December 1974. He applied for the fellowship to continue his research with the world leaders in his field in order to pursue a research career in human memory. His fellowship was at Stanford University, California, for psychology, and the University of California at Berkeley for the study of statistics. The academic experience at Stanford led Aldwyn to abandon his chosen research field and he almost resigned the fellowship to return to the UK. A three day visit from one of the Harkness committee persuaded him to remain and to learn more about technical and social developments in the United States. Taking this advice, he remained for his full term. This period gave him the phenomenal opportunity to meet and work with leaders in the developing field of micro computer technology and its application to education. On his return, Aldwyn was a leader of the team developing computer based education at the Open University. As Managing Director of Henley Distance learning, he initiated the first distance learning MBA in the UK, at Henley, then a world top ten business school. He ran a successful television production company for ten years. He moved to be PVC at the University of Glamorgan and led a substantial eLearning scheme. In 2007, he moved to Regent’s College in London where he led the acquisition of Degree Awarding Powers and University title and where he is currently Vice Chancellor. Professor Cooper sits on several national committees in Higher Education, has been a Governor of a large Further Education College and a large comprehensive school, and is now a commissioner of the Crown Estates Paving Commission. (Aldwyn wrote this in 2018. He passed away in 2021.)
Last updated: 5th April 2021

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Dr Edwina Moreton (HF 1976-78) OBE was a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for International Studies, MIT, collaborating on projects and publications at both MIT and Harvard on European security and east-west relations. Among many other things, she also learned how to calculate the kill probability of a ballistic missile re-entry vehicle on her (ladies’) slide-rule. Her Harkness Fellowship built on a BA in German and Russian (Bradford), an MSc in Political Science (Strathclyde) and a PhD on Soviet Studies (Glasgow). On her return to the UK she taught at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, before joining The Economist, where she worked for 30 years. As the paper’s Diplomatic Editor, she wrote on a wide range of security issues, from arms control, non-proliferation, trans-Atlantic relations and Asian security, to the UN, international justice and human rights. Boards and councils served on have included the UK Know-How Fund, Chatham House, the IISS and Wilton Park, as well as serving as a trustee and director of VERTIC, an NGO involved in treaty verification. She was made OBE by Queen Elizabeth and holds an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Birmingham. She is currently an Associate Fellow of Chatham House, an advisory council member of the McDonald Centre, Oxford, and serves on the European Advisory Group of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She served as Master of the Worshipful Company of World Traders, City of London, 2018-19.
Last updated: 17th May 2021

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James Bathurst (HF 1977-79) was encouraged to apply for a fellowship by a previous HF while a PhD student.  The fellowship allowed him to undertake post-doctoral research on mountain river hydraulics at Colorado State University (CSU), Fort Collins. An immediate outcome of his fellowship was the co-founding, together with colleagues from CSU and the UK, of what has become an internationally recognized programme of workshops on Gravel-bed Rivers that have been held every five years since 1980. In 1979 James joined the then Natural Environment Research Council’s Institute of Hydrology at Wallingford, Oxfordshire, (now the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology) and became part of a European collaboration to develop an advanced river catchment model (the Système Hydrologique Européen) for use in predicting the impacts of climate and land use change. James also continued his rivers research through a collaboration with the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland.  He was seconded to a research unit at Newcastle University in 1985, and subsequently joined the University as a staff member in 1992.  While there, he carried out technology transfer projects for the catchment model in India and Chile and applications to Mediterranean desertification, landslide hazard and forest impacts on floods in Latin America.  James acquired his knowledge of landslides during a Churchill Fellowship visit to New Zealand in 1990. Most recently he has worked with colleagues in Chile on the impact of forests on floods, an occupation he continues following his retirement from Newcastle University in 2020 as Reader in Erosion and Sediment Transport.
Last updated: 14th March 2021

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Paul Calthrop (HF 1977-79) : Paul retired as a director of Bain & Company, management consultants, in 2012. He joined them in 1979 from Stanford Graduate School of Business where, thanks to the generosity of the Harkness Foundation, he had completed a Masters in Business Administration. Prior to Stanford, Paul had qualified as a chartered accountant in London. This was the time of the miners’ strike, three day week, pay freeze, and IMF rescue of sterling, which all helped persuade Paul of the importance of strategic thinking as applied to businesses and economies.  At Stanford he became aware of the then-emerging field of business strategy.  He joined Bain and worked directly with the founders. There were fifty people in the firm when he started; approximately ten thousand when he retired. His work took him from Boston to London to Sydney to Zurich to Melbourne and his clients took him all over the world.  Paul, acting in a personal capacity with several Bain partners, created Workplace Giving Australia, which to date has raised more than $250M of new funding for social organisations.  He also helped create the Centre for Social Impact, a university research organisation focused on raising community capacity. Paul left Bain for a period to work in private equity, but returned, having proven to himself that he did not enjoy the process of buying and selling businesses. He and his wife, Susan, now live in Queensland, Australia, where Paul would be happy if he never saw the inside of another plane.
Last updated: 22nd March 2021

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Cataldo Louis Cammarata (HF 1977 - 78) graduated in English and American literature before deciding to pursue a legal career. He graduated from Aix-en-Provence law school and joined the French Bar in 1976.  While taking the Bar exam, Cataldo decided to apply for post graduate studies at a US university and was admitted to the Harvard Law School. But it was the award of a Harkness Fellowship that allowed his dream to be fulfilled. The Harkness support changed his cultural approach and professional career. Cataldo’s exposure to American culture and high educational standards made him realize his future would be unmistakably different to the one he had imagined. It allowed him to consider a wider, international frontier beyond his previous European ambitions. After travelling throughout the United States following his graduation from Harvard, Cataldo returned to Paris and rejoined the Bar where he is still practicing. He lectured for over ten years at both the Sorbonne and Aix-en-Provence law schools. Although a staunch Anglophile, Cataldo says he would never have made it practicing at international level had he not been awarded a Harkness Fellowship.  Currently, he practices in Paris at Squadra Avocats, a law firm he founded in 2004 and which houses a corporate international full-service practice.
Last updated: 5th May 2021

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Koen Lenaerts (HF 1977 - 79) was born in 1954 in Mortsel, Belgium. He obtained his law degree in 1977 at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium). With the award of a Harkness Fellowship in the same year, he continued his studies at Harvard University where he obtained a Master of Laws in 1978 and a Master in Public Administration in 1979. Returning to the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven he became a Doctor of Law in 1982 and started first as a lecturer and then a professor of European law in 1983. He also taught at the College of Europe in Bruges (Belgium) from 1984 to 1989, and at Harvard Law School as a visiting professor in 1989.  Mr Lenaerts’ career at the Court of Justice began when he became legal secretary (law clerk) to Judge René Joliet, a post he occupied from 1984 to 1985, before practising law at the Brussels Bar from 1986 to 1989. He was appointed judge at the Court of First Instance of the European Communities on 25th September 1989, the first day of this newly created court. He served on this Court for more than 14 years before being appointed judge at the Court of Justice in 2003. Mr. Lenaerts was elected by his peers as President of Chamber for two successive mandates from 2006 to 2012 and then as Vice-President of the Court of Justice in 2012. He was elected President of the Court of Justice in 2015, a post he occupies to this day.
Last updated: 5th May 2021

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Anthony Long (HF 1977-79)) studied how controversial UK land use policy conflicts at that time, particularly new motorways, might be handled differently in federal government systems. Catapulted from the planning department in the remote Colne Town Hall on the edge of the Pennines to the U.S. Capitol in Washington DC, he joined the Congressional Fellowship Programme of the American Political Science Association working first for Senator John Culver (D-Iowa) and then Representative Les AuCoin (D-Oregon).  In his second year, he joined AuCoin’s successful 1978 electoral campaign in Oregon, followed by six months assisting an unusual majority coalition in the State Legislature of New Mexico.  Returning to the UK, he joined the Council for the Protection of Rural England working on many nationally significant land use planning controversies. After a short research tenure in Paris in 1986, Anthony joined the staff of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) in the UK. In 1989 he established and led a dedicated WWF policy office in Brussels to influence EU environmental policy and legislation, a role he continued to undertake until his retirement in 2015 He has published several articles on environmental lobbying and was visiting professor at the College of Europe in Bruges.  He maintained close links with the US through his 10-year membership of the Sustainability Advisory Council of the Dow Chemical Company in Michigan. Continuing to reside in Brussels, Anthony advises local, national and international non-governmental and advocacy organisations, occasionally teaches environmental politics and is a Trustee of the Andrew Lees Trust-UK.
Last updated: 8th June 2020

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Sara Nathan (HF1977-79) OBE went straight to Stanford University the term after graduating in History from New Hall, Cambridge, the only woman awarded a fellowship in 1977.  Her first year studying for an MA in History showed her that she was going to be the world’s worst academic historian. In the second year, she studied Broadcast Communication – unavailable in the UK then. This persuaded the BBC to employ her as a News Trainee in 1980. She progressed to roles as a producer in the TV newsroom, output editor for Breakfast and Newsnight, and film-maker for the Money Programme. She helped launch Radio 5Live, becoming the Editor of the morning programme.  Meanwhile, she had crashed a Harkness reunion gathering and met Malcolm Singer (HF 1980-82). They married in 1984, have two grown-up children and nearly a grandson.  In 1995, she was appointed Editor, Channel 4 News: the first woman to edit a network news programme.  In 1998, Sara left daily news and went plural, filling up to six part-time roles at a time including some journalism. She has been on a number of boards including Ofcom, the Judicial Appointments Commission and the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority.  She now chairs tribunals for the Nursing & Midwifery Council, is a Senior Hearings Manager back at the BBC and, most often, a trustee, host and volunteer with Refugees At Home: a charity she co-founded in 2015 to match destitute asylum-seekers and refugees with generous hosts who have spare rooms.
Last updated: 13th March 2019

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David Soskin (HF 1977-79) was from an early age interested in a business career. Following a First Class Honours degree in Modern History from Magdalen College, Oxford, and a stint at an American commercial bank, he was awarded a Fellowship to study at the Harvard Business School. In 1984, after several years as management consultant, David was appointed Director of Corporate Planning for Redland PLC, a FTSE 100 company. In 1989, he left to start his first entrepreneurial venture, Asquith Court Schools which became the UK’s largest independent nursery school company. In 2000, David led a management buy-in of Cheapflights, the first travel flight price comparison business website and spent eight years as CEO and another six as a board member during which time Cheapflights purchased Momondo and became one of the world’s largest travel search companies. In 2017, Cheapflights/Momondo was acquired by the Bookings Holdings (Priceline). In 2006 David co-founded HOWZAT Partners, a Venture Capital company which invests in early- stage digital businesses globally. It has a portfolio of sixty companies. David took time out of his commercial career to work for the Prime Minister in the Number 10 Policy Unit where he advised John Major on law and order and welfare policies. David retains his interest in politics and supported the Leave campaign in the 2016 referendum. David’s philanthropic activities include his support for City Year, a leading youth and education charity, the Chichester Festival Theatre and the American Civil War Trust where he is a Regimental Color Bearer.
Last updated: 25th May 2018

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David Walker (HF 1977-79) was senior reporter for The Times Higher Education Supplement when he applied for a Harkness Fellowship, in 1977 — a decision precipitated by voters in the Holborn ward who chose not to favour his candidacy for Camden Council. Interested in lobbying, and the influence of professional associations on public policymaking, as an HF David joined the Congressional Fellowship program, and spent wonderful nine months in Washington DC, working in both the House and Senate as a staffer. The second half of his fellowship was spent at the Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley where he began work on what became Media Made in California, cowritten with Jeremy Tunstall and published by Oxford in 1981. On his return, just after the May 1979 election, David joined the staff of The Economist and pursued a career in journalism, for The Times, The Independent, the BBC and the Guardian, returning to Berkeley for a sabbatical and feeding insights from his time in Congress into Sources Close to the Prime Minister (with Peter Hennessy, 1984) and The Times Guide to the New British State (1995). David left journalism to become managing director, public reporting at the Audit Commission and is now deputy chair of Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, chair of Understanding Society, a member of the ethics and governance council of UK Biobank and co author with Polly Toynbee of Unjust Rewards, The Verdict and Dismembered.
Last updated: 25th May 2018

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Tom Hayhoe (HF 1978-80) is chairman at West London Mental Health NHS Trust which, as well as providing mental health services in west London, operates Broadmoor Hospital. Prior this appointment he served as chairman of West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust. He attended Stanford Graduate School of Business as a Harkness Fellow, following a year as President of Cambridge Students Union. On returning from his Harkness Fellowship he worked for McKinsey & Company and then WH Smith before establishing the Brackenbury Group retail consultancy (subsequently The Chambers) and chairing the board of Gamestation, at the time the UK’s second largest video game retailer. During his MBA studies he took a course in health economics and policy which lead to him helping develop the health and social care policies of the Social Democratic Party (for whom he stood for parliament in the 1987 general election), taking a series of non-executive roles in the NHS starting in 1985, and ultimately being appointed to his current role. Tom is a keen offshore sailor and a former vice commodore of the Royal Ocean Racing Club. He is a trustee and chair of the finance committee of Arthritis Research UK.
Last updated: 25th May 2018

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