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Date : 26/09/2018 | Time : 6:30 pm | Location : The North Library, The Athenaeum Club


Intelligence agencies like GCHQ today access digital information in bulk, including global communications and personal data, in order to derive secret intelligence on targets ranging from dictators to terrorists and cyber criminals. Parliament has now provided a new legal framework for such intelligence gathering in the Investigative Powers Act 2016, including strengthened judicial and Parliamentary oversight. But the power of modern ‘big data’ to reveal so much about our private lives and to be exploited by others to influence our choices remains controversial. Sir David Omand is exceptionally well-placed to explore the implications for national security, commerce and personal privacy of the digital revolution. He is the author of Securing the State, published in 2010, and Principled Spying: the ethics of secret intelligence, published this summer by Oxford University Press.

Sir David is a Visiting Professor at the War Studies Department, King’s College London and at PSIA Sciences Po in Paris. He is an honorary Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. His previous career included being UK Security and Intelligence Coordinator in the Cabinet Office, Permanent Secretary of the Home Office, Director of GCHQ, and Deputy Under Secretary of State for Policy in the Ministry of Defence. He served for seven years on the UK’s Joint Intelligence Committee.

There will be a reception from 6.30pm; wine, soft drinks and light snacks will be on offer. Guests are, of course, most welcome. The dress code at The Athenaeum is suits and ties for men and “elegant” for women.

Bookings

Ticket Type Price Spaces
HFA Member ^ £20.00
Members' Guests £15.00
Non Member £23.00
Second or Further Tickets for Non-members £20.00


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^ You are an HFA member if you pay an annual donation to the Harkness Fellows Association.

^^ In case we need to call about changes to the event.